St. Louis Building Arts Foundation

The Frank Lloyd Wright House in Ebsworth Park Benefit Party — SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Remarkable Reminders: Architectural Fragments at the future National Building Arts Center

Explore the site of an upcoming museum and research facility housing the nation’s largest collection of architectural artifacts. View the vast trove of beautiful building fragments — ornamental brick, terracotta, metalwork, stone, hardware and more — saved from St. Louis landmarks and buildings around the country. Meet Director Larry Giles who has salvaged these architectural treasures for more than forty years. Enjoy the spirited early jazz and swing music performed by the fabulous Miss Jubilee and the Humdingers. Savor elegant party fare topped off with gelato and cake in honor of Frank Lloyd Wright’s 146th birthday.

Date: June 2, 2013
Individual tickets cost: $125
Transportation: On own to site; walking once on site
Dress Code: Casual dress & walking shoes

(Note: Proceeds support the preservation and projects of the The Frank Lloyd Wright House in Ebsworth Park.)

To receive an invitation, please e-mail info@ebsworthpark.org or call 314-822-8359.


Mission Statement

The St. Louis Building Arts Foundation promotes public awareness of the crucial roles of architecture, manufacturing, construction, and urban design in the history and future of greater St. Louis.

The Foundation's work engages not only the fields of architectural history and historic preservation but also pressing civic issues. The Foundation aims to shape the built environment today by preserving and promoting the finest traditions in the building arts. Partnering with local industry, construction trades, universities, neighborhood groups, and government agencies, the Foundation aims to bring together vastly different segments of the metropolitan community who share a common concern for the health of St. Louis's urban landscape and historic building stock.

The Foundation is a federally-recognized 501(c)3 tax-exempt organization.


Activities

National Architectural Arts Center
In 2005, the St. Louis Building Arts Foundation acquired the former Sterling Steel Casting foundry in Sauget, Illinois just across the Mississippi River from downtown St. Louis. The 15-acre, 13-building facility is currently under renovation. Here, the Foundation is launching the National Architectural Arts Center, an unparalleled educational center housing our architectural artifacts collection and research library. The National Architectural Arts Center is envisioned as the nation's premiere museum of architecture.

Collections
The Foundation owns large, unique collections of architectural artifacts and literature essential to its educational mission and crucial to the work of historians and scholars across the country. The Foundation's artifact collection is the largest private collection in the United States and contains over 300,000 items. The Foundation also owns period working shops and production lines that will be used to demonstrate the process associated with the manufacturing of historic building materials, as well as the study and practice of materials conservation technology. The library encompasses an estimated quarter million rare and out of print books, periodicals, trade catalogs, historic photographs, drawings and other documents related to the building arts.

Education
Through exhibits, tours, publications and other activities the Foundation engages the public on issues of architecture and design. Past exhibitions of Foundation artifacts have appeared at the Missouri Historical Society, Missouri Botanical Garden, Washington University, Sheldon Foundation for the Arts, the St. Louis University Art Museum, the First Street Forum and the Forum for Contemporary Art.

Outreach and Assistance
The Foundation provides assistance and advice to organizations, educational institutions, museums and government agencies that are undertaking preservation and conservation projects. Additionally, the Foundation aims to raise national awareness of St. Louis' incredible architecture.